This week’s Reading, Writing and Links

YES–A banker counts social capital as equal to economic capital, vital & essential to business. http://t.co/505G3iIgia

My take on the communications dust-ups surrounding the new EPA rules–that aren’t even out yet. http://tinyurl.com/ojr92bm

Stash this for climate & sustainability comms: Krugman explains why carbon reduction is affordable (and prudent!). http://t.co/qqh1qgq1fj

GREAT prep on the EPA ‘s 6/2 rule to limit carbon & why it’s a positive BFD. http://t.co/24RGaJyEJ0

Tons of Newark Riverfront summer fun planned. Love seeing NJ citizens enjoying our shared waters. http://t.co/9lvANmTZ6a

Congrats to @GreenSportsBlog friend Lew Blaustein for 1 year & 100 posts about where green & sports connect! http://t.co/Ec11h1E1ar

Grateful to say I’m a new Fellow at the Institute for Sustainable Enterprise. http://t.co/Vf3mVZ21Z7

Getting to a carbon tax: 3 options for improving how EPA addresses air pollutants. http://t.co/jl2XORmzDY

Do it, Mr. President: President Said to Be Planning to Use Executive Authority on Carbon Rule. http://t.co/OyA05eZK8z

Attended a letter writing evening with my local CCL chapter. Felt good to write directly & honestly to my reps asking them to act on climate for a carbon tax.

China announces next steps for cutting .28b tonnes of HFCs by 2015. http://t.co/6RNPs45jVR

Just registered, looking forward to 6/25 sustainability event with the U.S. Green Building Council in Philly. http://t.co/FEuyGyVP8l

Searing. “I don’t give a shit that you feel sorry for me…Get to work and do something.” http://t.co/GdrC4xNqq0

How to Pitch a Major EPA Rule On Carbon Pollution

Simple and clear.

EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy spoke on a briefing call today about the rules her agency will announce on June 2 to fight global warming.

The new regulations will limit “coal-fired plants from spewing so much carbon into the atmosphere,” as Jonathan Cohn puts it, writing with verve for The New Republic.

Administrator McCarthy made three points:

1. This is about moving from climate risk to economic opportunity.

2. The proposed rules are “legally sound, solid and doable.”

3. It’s not one-size-fits-all. U.S. states will have flexibility in how to apply the rules.

That’s the way to do it. Simple and clear.

By talking today, she got out in front of the controversy already in full spin from people who oppose these measures.

They claim that stricter enforcement of Federal clean-air laws will cost jobs, endanger businesses and send homeowner electricity costs soaring.

Exhibit A, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce has come out swinging:  U.S. industry gears up to fight Obama’s climate rules

On the pro-climate action side, Cohn’s piece for The New Republic is a valuable Q&A on the issues.

Via The New Republic:

Obama’s New Rules for Coal Plants Are a B.F.D. The Ensuing Political Fight May Be Even Bigger.

Conventional wisdom holds that second term presidencies rarely yield accomplishments and that this second term president, in particular, has lost the ability to get much done. In one week, President Obama has a chance to prove that the conventional wisdom is wrong.

And he can do it while helping to stop the planet from cooking.

On June 2, Obama will to unveil a new set of federal regulations on power plants, designed primarily to keep coal-fired plants from spewing so much carbon into the atmosphere. The hope is that these new regulations will slow down climate change—at first incrementally, by reducing emissions from existing plants in the U.S., and then more dramatically, by providing the Administration with more leverage to negotiate a far-reaching, international treaty on emissions from multiple sources.

I’m sensing a growing divide between businesses that align themselves with spokespersons on the anti-regulation side, such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, or on the pro-climate action side, such as Business for Innovative Climate & Energy Policy (BICEP) or the American Sustainable Business Council.

Sooner or later–I’m betting sooner–businesses will have to choose which side of the table–anti-regulation or pro-climate action–will best be able to represent and further their interests long-term.

I’m looking forward to that debate.